Search This Blog

Saturday, September 14, 2019

5 Benefits of Sled Training


A Sled is a versatile tool that can make you Stronger, more Powerful while making you Healthier!


Here are 5 benefits to sled training, each with its own routine.
I have made each routine very simple and easy to follow. There are only 3 exercises to learn!
These routines can be added into your training schedule, or be done in season. Much of what I learned about sled training came from Ben Patrick, check him out for more info!


Before we dive in let me point out 3 keys to remember when Sled Training

  • Push through the feet, toes
  • Maintain core stability
  • Do not train through pain

1) Build up Tendons and Ligaments 

    This is done by stimulating the structure in a healthy way. Tendons break down due to:
    - Ageing
    - Reduced blood flow
    - Overuse
    - Direct trauma

    Sled training is unique in that it will not allow you to do the exercise with a load that is too heavy since you will not be able to move it. 
    The routine will focus on high volume, with the load being increased as needed.
    Tendons and ligaments do not receive the same blood flow as muscles, use the sled to drive as much blood as possible into the tendons and ligaments.
    Sled work increases isometric and concentric strength of muscles. When your muscles are loaded the connected tendons are also stimulated to strengthen. 
    We use this method to strengthen athletes joints, see How to Cure Knee Pain

    Goal: 

    Push as much weight as possible for the required distance. Avoid Pain!

    Dosage: 
    Up to 6 days per week 

    Routine:

    Bear Crawl - 2 minutes 
    - Go as far as you can

    Sled Drive - 4x50 meters
    - Focus on lengthening steps

    Reverse Sled - 4x50 meters 
    - Focus on shorter quicker steps

    ⬇️A great way to complete the routine is to superset the two exercises see here⬇️




2) Conditioning


    The low impact and lack of eccentric phase make sled work a great way to improve conditioning.
    When working to improve conditioning (for court sports especially), fatigue and overuse injuries can be a problem. 
    If I were coaching a team I would actually try to reduce the amount of running my team would do as much as possible. Instead, I would use a sled to condition them. 
    Athletes in a season already run in games and practices. There is no need to make them run hundreds as lines as well. 


    Goal: Complete the distance with as little sets as possible, before focusing on increasing load.


    Dosage: 

    3-4 days per week

    Routine:

    Bear Crawl - 2 minutes 
    -Go as far as you can

    Forward Sled - x200 meters 
    - In as few sets as possible
    - Long steps
    Reverse Sled - x200 meters 
    - In as few sets as possible
    - Small, quick steps

3) Active Recovery (Or Warm-Up)

    The reality is that the most effective ways to recover will always be sleep and nutrition

    Active recovery is more effective than many of the common recovery methods you might be using such as foam rolling, icing, heating and many others. These methods are all designed to stimulate blood flow to the muscles. Read more here from PJF Performance (NBA Trainer) on recovery.
    Active Recovery increases blood flow better than all of these methods. It also does not numb the area to pain like icing or hurt like foam rolling often does (I have always found it difficult to consistently foam roll as it involves pain and discomfort).
    Pushing or pulling a sled does not have an eccentric phase. The eccentric phase of an exercise is the lengthening of the muscle while being under load. This is when micro-tears to the muscle happen, casing soreness following activity. The sled only has an isometric and concentric phase so it will not make you sore the next day!

    Goal: Complete the routine, without exhausting the muscles. Increase blood flow.

    Dosage: 

    Following intense activity

    Routine:


    Bear Crawl - 2 minutes 
    - Go as far as you can

    Forward Sled - x200 meters 
    - In as few sets as possible
    - Long Steps
    Reverse Sled - x200 meters 
    - In as few sets as possible
    - Short, quick steps

4) Power Development


    For power, we want low volume, paired with high intensity. To increase maximum power you want to be well-rested in between sets, allowing for each rep to be done with maximum effort. We aren't as focused on the length of your strides so much as just moving the sled as fast as possible
    You want to use a weight that is heavy enough that is challenging, but that you can still move with some speed.

    Goal: Move the sled as fast as possible. Use an appropriate load. We want long explosive strides.


    Dosage: 

    1-2 times per week

    Routine:


    Bear Crawl - 2 minutes 
    - Go as far as you can

    Forward Sled Sprint- 3x10 meters 
    - Allow for full recovery in between each set
    - Max Speed
    Reverse Sled Sprint - 3x10 meters 
    - Allow for full recovery in between each set
    - Max Speed
    * This routine is a great lead up for max sprints *



5) Strength


    Strength can be improved similar to power. Although your focus is not to move the sled as quickly as possible. You want to have lots of rest with minimal volume but work up to pushing the sled with as much added load as possible.

    Goal: Move as much weight as possible for the required distance. Increase the load as needed.


    Dosage:
    1-2 times per week


    Routine:

    Bear Crawl - 2 minutes
    - Go as far as you can

    Forward Sled Sprint - 5x10 meters
    - Allow for full recovery in between each set

    Reverse Sled Sprint- 5x10 meters
    - Allow for full recovery in between each set


    Add any variation of this routine into your training today!


    Final Thought

    The sled is versatile because it can mimic walking up or down slopes with added resistance. Humans evolved walking on uneven terrain. The shoes we wear now, along with the flat hard ground are allowing our feet, lower legs and knees to be weak! Read more here

    Stay tuned. I will be posting information on how to get the same effect as a sled, without any equipment!
    How will you use sled training into your routine?

    Thank you for reading
    Matt

Email: koenig.matthew546@gmail.com
WhatsApp: +1 204 891 6851







References: Read and learn more on Sled Training at the following links



Note:
The information above is not a substitute for medical advice. If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, it is always better to see your doctor before starting any type of rehabilitation to ensure you are properly diagnosed.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.